Filed under Editorial, Opinion

Hayfield’s maintenance is falling short

The+science+courtyard.
The science courtyard.

The science courtyard.

Maggie Markon

Maggie Markon

The science courtyard.

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The sky is falling. Well, the ceiling is. Classroom ceilings actually are collapsing, posing a threat to unassuming students who sit below. The sizable section of ceiling in the journalism lab, for example, recently caved in due to a busted pipe, crumbling onto a table below. Fortunately, there were no students in the room at the time.

The ceiling in the journalism lab.

The problems don’t stop there. The science courtyard, which has been home to many duck families, is akin to a post-apocalyptic wasteland, with considerably overgrown greenery and tree remnants scattered about.

Black garbage bags cover toilets that are out of use—and have been for some time—which makes bathrooms even more crowded.

There is mold growing in science classrooms, and faded lines in the junior parking lot make it almost impossible to see clearly in the morning.

Classroom temperatures are extreme: swamp or tundra—there is no temperate climate to be found.

Multiple water fountains are broken, forcing students to walk out of their way during class or passing time.

The flower beds in the front of the school are unkempt and littered with trash, which does not afford it a quality first impression to onlookers.

Hayfield was most recently renovated in 2002, which leaves it entirely off the renovation queue status, as determined by the Fairfax County 2019-23 Capital Improvement Program. The list is comprised of 63 schools renovated before 1992 that either have been renovated, are being renovated or are slotted for renovation in the near future.

A toilet in the girl’s bathroom in the English hallway.

Minh Vu
A flower bed by door 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In other words, Hayfield won’t be considered for renovation until at least five years from now.
Our school does not need elaborate amenities that cost millions, but it does require basic upkeep through funded services and student volunteerism. If these problems are not dealt with soon, they will accumulate to an irreversible and possibly dangerous extent.

Worst of all, Hayfield’s rundown appearance belies the exceptional people who frequent it. Students will be more motivated to succeed if they are in a nurturing environment; the administration just needs to show that they care about the building as much as they say that they care about us.

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