Filed under Feature, News

Improv Team makes a comeback

Improv+competes+on+Dec.+8%2C+2017%2C+at+Annandale+High+Schoolwhere+they+won+first+and+second+place+and+the+Historic+Improv+Champion+Trophy.+
Improv competes on Dec. 8, 2017, at Annandale High Schoolwhere they won first and second place and the Historic Improv Champion Trophy.

Improv competes on Dec. 8, 2017, at Annandale High Schoolwhere they won first and second place and the Historic Improv Champion Trophy.

Brynn Spradlin

Brynn Spradlin

Improv competes on Dec. 8, 2017, at Annandale High Schoolwhere they won first and second place and the Historic Improv Champion Trophy.

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Centered around a series of creativity and acting based games, improvisation (improv) has long stood as a pinnacle of theatrical creative expression, and improv games on the high school level are often wonderful means of developing acting skills; however, in recent years, Hayfield only had an official team on the middle school level. Disappointed by the lack of improv opportunities for Hayfield high schoolers, sophomore Brynn Spradlin took the initiative to form a high school team at the start of the 2017-2018 school year.

“While going through some old Dramahawk boxes, I found a plaque from 2009 for second place at an improv competition, and I thought [that I could do] better than that. I have a lot of funny friends, and I love comedy and having fun,” Spradlin said. “I had to jump [through] a lot of hoops and ended [up] going to the middle school theatre teacher, Mrs. Courlander, and we set up the dates and got it approved. My goal with these teams is to get more kids involved with theatre and improv and maybe even get a club going.”

Tryouts were held early in the school year, and 11 new members were selected and divided into two teams. Senior Christian Pineda was named co-captain.

“I love improv because it’s really a way to express yourself, and it allows you to be who you want to be. Theatre is fun as a whole, but often you have these strict scripts you have to stick to, while [with] improv there are no limitations and no restrictions,” Pineda said. “That freedom you get by being yourself and entertaining others is what I love most.”

After first getting themselves off the ground, the team began attending a competition at a different school monthly, with each subdivided team of students delegating who would perform in a given myriad of games.

“Each school sends in one or two teams, and we play 3-5 improv games and get judged by professional improvisers. Hayfield is actually the top two rated teams in the county in [only] our first year,” Spradlin said. “Comedy is found in rough times, and the excitement of being on stage with people you love is amazing.”

In addition to the understanding of a variety of games with complex rules, practicing improv is imperative to success as team relationships and trust are of utmost importance, yet quite different than practice for any other organized team event.

“We practice during SOAR 4 every white day during competition time. We practice by either having a list of games that we will be playing at our next competition and practice those until it’s second nature to play by the certain rules in that game,” freshman Max von Kolnitz said. “When it is not competition time, we have an idea of games we want to practice — to work on quick responses or character building games that require us to learn how to build a funny character. You have to trust each other so much in order to stand up there and say what’s on your mind to make the audience laugh.”

Looking into the future, both inside and out of the realm of theatre, improv offers a wide variety of skills especially helpful to students looking to the future.

“Improv accesses a different set of skills that you don’t usually get to explore with regular theatre activities,” senior Sommer Bauman said. “You have to be able to think on your feet and be original, which doesn’t come into play as much when you have a script on hand. It also really draws on your compatibility with your teammates, though. You have to trust each other to carry the scene along without letting the story drop or get boring, and without leaving anyone in position where they’re stuck without anything to say or do.”

Improv competitions are a whole new level of entertainment; with great unpredictability and promised humor as the Dramahawks will do anything “for the gag,” all are encouraged to come cheer on the team in upcoming competitions.

“Our next competition is April 13, [and] people should attend in order to laugh and smile and see that acting is a part of a lot of different things instead of huge productions and musical numbers,” Pineda said.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Improv Team makes a comeback

    Feature

    “Enough is Enough” student fundraiser to be held at Edison on April 20

  • Feature

    International Night performance displays lack of restraint within student body

  • Improv Team makes a comeback

    Feature

    The planetarium has fallen short of its potential

  • Improv Team makes a comeback

    Feature

    How social media is changing the game

  • Improv Team makes a comeback

    Feature

    Behind the scenes of International Night

  • Improv Team makes a comeback

    Feature

    Snow day policy stirs confusion

  • Improv Team makes a comeback

    Feature

    The elephant in the room: Hayfield’s Young Republicans club

  • Improv Team makes a comeback

    Feature

    Black History Month readings encourage to students to reflect and remember

  • Improv Team makes a comeback

    Feature

    Reactions to recent school walkout are divided

  • Improv Team makes a comeback

    Feature

    One-to-one technology: a growing possibility for local schools

Improv Team makes a comeback